Impact of Hidradenitis Suppurativa on Work Loss, Indirect Costs and Income

British Journal of Dermatology, August 18, 2018

BACKGROUND:

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), a chronic cutaneous disease, can negatively affect work life.

OBJECTIVES:

This retrospective cohort study evaluates the indirect burden among employed patients with HS in the U.S.A.

METHODS:

Newly diagnosed and general patients with HS, who were employees (age 18-64 years) from a large claims database (Q1 1999 to Q1 2015), were matched 1 : 5 to controls. Income growth and risk of leaving the workforce were assessed among the newly diagnosed HS and control cohorts in the 5-year study period. Incomework loss days and indirect costs (absenteeism and disability) were assessed among the general HS and control cohorts in the 1-year study period.

RESULTS:

Newly diagnosed (n = 1003, mean age 39·5 years, 66·3% female) and general patients with HS (n = 1204, mean age 39·9 years, 69·1% female) were matched to 5015 and 6020 controls, respectively. Newly diagnosed patients with HS had significantly slower incomegrowth ($324 per year) and higher risk of leaving the workforce (adjusted hazard ratio 1·65, 95% confidence interval 1·45-1·88) compared with controls (all P < 0·05). General patients with HS had more total days of work loss (18·4 vs. 7·7), higher annual total indirect costs ($2925 vs. $1483) and lower annual income ($54 925 vs. $62 357) than controls (all P < 0·001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with newly diagnosed HS and general patients with HS experienced a greater indirect burden than matched controls.

View abstract

Authors

Tzellos T, Yang H, Mu F, Calimlim B, Signorovitch J